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Screen Shot 2017 11 16 at 1.05.51 PM CroppedHave you ever thought about becoming a pescaterian? Then you should get to know the Chicago Pescetarian, an amazing food blogger who is doing a lot to promote and educate her audience about not only the deliciousness of different types of seafood, but sustainability and the environmental aspects as well. And we fully support that! (as well as enjoying her amazing restaurant recommendations in the Chicagoland area and beyond).

So without further adieu, meet Pooja!12096046 1907416442817244 8458593911305447336 n

Why did you start your blog? When did you start and more importantly, why did you start and how did you get to where you are are today?

I launched Chicago’s first and only seafood blog in 2015, and I've been a pescetarian for 7 years now. I used to eat meat, and then I tried to be a vegetarian but missed fish too much, since I grew up on the coast in Mumbai and it was such a staple. Plus I didn’t want to just start a more typical food blog, and I saw the opening since there was no real seafood blog based in Chicago. And I wanted to draw attention to the amazing seafood that's being created in the Midwest!

Where would you recommend that we eat in Chicago?

If you're in Chicago or planning a trip, some of my favorite restaurants are Swift and Sons, Shaw's, Duck Duck Goat, Shanghai Terrace at the Peninsula, and Le Bouchon.

Who are some of your personal favorite chefs/cooks? How about bloggers? Who inspires you?

Chef Jean Joho from the Chicago restaurant Everest makes amazing French-Alsatian dishes, particular a phenomenal lobster dish. I studied French for many years, so I'm a Francophile! I also love Rick Bayless, since he took the time to actually get to know Mexican cuisine and even lived in the country for years. I'm also a big fan of Bill Kim from Urban Belly, he makes such imaginative cuisine and is the nicest guy.

I follow Sherrie Savors the City, Chicago Food Stories (I love that they feature less glamorous places to eat), Best Food Alex, and more.

23376279 2391516721073878 5411371524982620903 nWhat restaurants would you LOVE to eat at? They can be anywhere in the world.

Any location of David Chang's Momofuku restaurants, and Jiro for the most exceptional sushi experience ever in Japan.

Let's talk serious foodie aspirations. What’s your “last meal” dish? If you could only eat one thing for the rest of your life, what would it be? And if you could travel anywhere in the world, where would you go?

My last meal would have to be a really elegant Bouillabaisse (French seafood stew). La Sardine in Chicago and Oceanique in Evanston make my favorite versions in the Chicagoland area - they use the saffron and the fennel really delicately. I grew up with Indian food, but if I had to stick to one cuisine I would have to say sushi since I can switch it up with nigiri, sashimi, different types of rolls, etc. I can eat sushi any time of day! And if I could go anywhere in the world? I would go to Japan to eat all the nigiri, then eat all the langoustine in Iceland, and then go anywhere in the world that serves good caviar.

Do you have a food motto that you live by? What is it?

I believe in the concept of “good food good mood”. You have to feel good about putting good food in your body! Food is such a big part of our lives. People connect about food and over food so much; what's more, bad food can ruin your day while good food can make your day. If your food is great, why not live to eat?

21752810 2363597087199175 4044513182979622815 oWhat’s the one piece of foodie advice you’d like to share with our audience?

Respect your ingredients and the ingredients will respect you! Also, price doesn’t always equal quality - there's a lots of great little fish and seafood shacks or little diners that people miss out on.

In addition, don’t necessarily think sustainable and organic and local are real qualitications with really doing your research. I did work with Shedd Aquarium here in Chicago and put out a list of reasonable seafood restaurants. Respect the ecosystem and environment!

What are your goals for your blog?

I'd love to write a book and have a travel show! I'd travel the world eating seafood and demystifying fish. I think a lot of people don’t venture into very far into the seafood realm cause they lack the knowledge or understanding of the various options. I also want my blog to be a platform for chefs!

But what I want to do is to help people start eating more environmentally friendly seafood. I want to contribute a lot more to the Ocean To Table movement doing things like promoting sustainable fishing methods and showing people how to shop for and buy fish and even showing how you can buy from local fisherman and fisheries like shares like CSA veggie boxes.

What’s your day job/what do you do in addition to blogging?

I'm a real estate broker with Weichert Realtors First For Chicago and the owner of a professional organization company called Organizing With You, Inc.

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When you're a child, receiving mail is almost a magical experience. Now most of the mail you get as an adult is either bills or junk. But it doesn't have to be that way! A big trend right now is box subscriptions. If you want a selection of products like makeup, dog toys, clothes or food to show up at your house on a monthly or weekly basis, there's probably a subscription service for it. Food is one of the most popular types of subscriptions, so there are plenty out there to choose from. Not only will you enjoy one (or two or three!), they also make excellent gifts. Get excited about checking the mail again with one of these food (or wine!) subscription services.

1. Treatsie

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Channel your inner Willy Wonka with this box of sugary goodness. Each month you'll get up to $25 worth of gourmet sweets from three different candymakers. They also offer Treatsie at Home Baking Kits, which help you make "dazzling and delicious desserts" with all of the ingredients pre-measured and step-by-step instructions.

Cost: $20/month, receive a discount when you buy a quarterly or annual subscription. 

2. Love with Food

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Healthy snacks that also help fight hunger? Sign us up! These boxes are also gluten-free, celiac safe and organic. There are a couple of box-size options to pick from, and each box set out means two meals are donated to a food bank in America. They also have options for offices, so you and your coworkers can help those struggling with hunger while you deal with the 3 p.m. office slump.

Cost: Boxes vary from as low as $7.99/month up to $25/month.

3. Club W

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If you love wine (and let's be honest, who doesn't?), then a wine subscription box should definitely be on your Christmas list. Each month you get new recommendations for you based on your palate profile, or you get to pick the wines on your own with their ever-changing assortment. The only downside is that not all states allow alcohol to be shipped directly to consumers, so if you live in AK, AL, AR, DE, HI, KY, MA, MS, OK, PA, RI, SD or UT, you're unable to order from Club W.

Cost: Starts at $52/month for four wines.

4. Blue Apron

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If for at least three nights a week you want to not have the "What do you want for dinner?" conversation, then get Blue Apron. Each week you get the ingredients to three meals for either two people or four people. The meals are delicious and fairly easy to make; the instructions are detailed, and for those real kitchen newbies, Blue Apron has videos available online. As a bonus, the packaging is all reusable or recyclable.

Cost: $59.94/week for two, $69.92/week for four.

5. Fuego Box

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Spice up your life with this hot sauce of the month club. This box isn't for the casual hot sauce fan, though. Fuego Box prides itself on finding sauces with "dynamic taste accompanied by the appropriate amount of heat," delivering you "sauces that you've probably never heard of."  

Cost: $12.95/month for one bottle, $29.95/month for three bottles.

6. Freshly

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The last thing you want to do when you get home from a long day is spend another hour making dinner. That's where Freshly comes in: There pre-made meals are prefect for busy professionals, couples on separate schedules, or really anyone who doesn't want to spend more than two minutes making a delicious and healthy meal.

 Cost: Starts at $49.99/week for four meals.

7. Carnivore Club

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Meat lovers, rejoice! We've got a box just for you. Carnivore Club offers its members four to six handcrafted cured meats from artisans around the world in a super cool faux-wood box. Now all you need is a cheese box and the Club W box, and you're got yourself a perfect Friday night.

Cost: $50/month.

8. Farm to People

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Can't get enough of the farmers market? Try Farm to People, where the farmers market comes to your house. Each month you receive small-batch, artisanal goodies with sustainable ingredients. This service supports local farmers with two options for you: "The Casual Foodie" gets three to four products, and "The Food Critic" gets five to eight products.

Cost: $29.95/month or $49.95/month.

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In case you missed it, Beyoncé is a vegan. 

Although we personally support her decision to adhere to a plant-based diet, the hype surrounding her diet change has left more than a few members of the "bey-hive" a little upset

But being vegan can be exciting, especially since your diet doesn't have to be all kale and quinoa. In fact, it takes little effort at all to eat like Bey, and to prove it to you all, we've compiled a guide to eating like Beyoncé.

 As we all know, breakfast is the most important meal of the day, and therefore should be nutritious and delicious. These vegan recipes are both of those things, and I'm sure if I tweeted them at her, Beyoncé would give them her seal of approval. 

Banana Oat Baked French Toast

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From Running With Spoons

Garlicky Bell Pepper Tofu Scramble with Waffled Jalapeño Hash Browns

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From Veggie And The Beast Feast

Chunky Apple Cinnamon Muffins

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From Averie Cooks

Lunch

It's easy for our midday meal to get caught in a tragic and boring routine, since most of us are chowing down during the middle of our work day. Make sure to prepare these recipes the night before, preferably while dancing to an all-Beyoncé Spotify playlist in your kitchen. Your homemade vegan lunch will be healthier than anything you could find at a restaurant around the corner from your office, and will have the Beyoncé blessing, which, let's be real, is better than a Michelin star.

Avocado Quesadillas

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From The Garden Grazer

Grilled Hummus and Caramelized Onion Sandwich

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From Katy's Kitchen

Cilantro Lime Chickpea Salad

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From Oh She Glows

Dinner

After having a delicious and filling vegan dinner with plenty of daily proteins and vitamins, you too will feel like you can run the world. 

Poblano and Portobello Fajitas

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From Minimalist Baker 

Green Chili Mac and Cheese

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From Minimalist Baker 

Mediterranean Baked Sweet Potatoes 

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From Minimalist Baker

 

17898-veggie-bin-header As you might imagine, food is always a hot topic at the Sustainable Foods Institute at the Monterey Bay Aquarium in California.

17898-conferenceAt its recent gathering in Monterey, the institute discussed the latest trends popping up in the food world and what we can expect to see more of over the coming year.

With seven billion people on our planet, naturally, people eat many different kinds of food in many different ways.

Here are five of the biggest trends, according to the institute:

1. Prepared Foods

Of all the food eaten in the U.S., 77 percent involves some or all prepared foods. Most of these, 50 percent, are eaten as snacks. The other 27 percent are the boxed foods to which home cooks add a protein, vegetable or other kitchen staple to the mix. These continue to be quite popular for families with moms who work and need to get dinner on the table quickly.

2. Meal Kits

This growing trend takes the idea of boxed meals and raises the bar. Ordinary people can now feel like chefs making extravagant dishes alone or with the family, even with children old enough to participate. The boxes arrive with a recipe, but what makes this even easier for busy people is that the ingredients arrive at your house already pre-portioned. Easy peasy lemon squeezy. A few of the many companies that now ship these meal kits directly to your front door are: Blue Apron, Sun Basket, Hello Fresh, Green Chef, Home Chef, Plated, Peach Dish and Green Blender.

3. Plant Forward

The importance of taking meat away from the center of the plate is a growing trend. A global demand for a meat-based diet places higher stress on the planet’s resources. Plants can often replace our favorite animal proteins, and the choices for consumers are growing. So we are seeing more and more companies adjust their mindset on what it means to be the "spotlight" protein of a meal. The store shelves will continue to grow with options for meat alternatives like soy and pea-based protein.

4. Plastic Revolution

This trend is more food adjacent involving the bags we carry our food in. We might be looking at a forced change in how we do that in the future. The institute stresses the world's need to reduce the health and environmental impact of plastic pollution on the food we eat. A prime example of how we can help is by getting rid of plastic bags at the grocery store (take your own reusable bags with you) as there are 13 to 20 billion plastic bags used per year in the United States. Proposition 67 on the California ballot is pushing to ban these bags completely; if it passes, the idea could spread to the rest of the country. 

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5. Alternative Eating Styles

Just like we see new words being added to the dictionary each year, there are increasingly new ways to describe how we eat. It is no longer just "meat-eater" or "vegetarian."

Here is a list of the labels people are now using to describe their eating habits:

Gluten-free: People who cannot or do not eat gluten, which is found in wheat, barley and rye.

Locavores: Those who don’t want their food to travel long distances, so they focus on buying food grown within 50 to 100 miles of where they live. 

Mediterranean: This is a diet based on habits of southern European countries, which uses a lot of olive oil in the recipes.

Paleo: People who go "paleo" eat vegetables, fish, meat and fruit, but avoid grain, dairy products or processed foods.

Pescatarian: This is basically a vegetarian who eats fish and other seafood, but no other kinds of meat.

Raw Foods: This diet consists of unprocessed and uncooked plant-based foods, usually organic.

Sustainable: This environmentally friendly diet focuses on ways of eating that have low impact on the planet, which contributes to food and nutrition security as well as a healthy life for present and future generations.

Vegetarian: This tried-and-true diet does not include any meat.

Vegan: This eating trend goes a step beyond vegetarian and does not include any animal products.

Monterey Bay Aquarium helps businesses and consumers choose seafood that’s caught or farmed in ways that support a healthy ocean. Click this link Seafood Watch to learn more about their programs.

iStock 175727304 CroppedAll humans reportedly possess a natural characteristic that can help explain why we can "learn" to love foods and things we once hated. While it’s common for young children to hate spicy foods, coffee or alcohol, we can learn to like the taste of things that our bodies are designed to reject in our younger years.

It's A Human Characteristic

Paul Rozin, a cultural psychologist at the University of Pennsylvania, has looked in the phenomena of "benign masochism" – the idea that our bodies reject certain things such as amusement rides or sad movies.

And while we know these things can’t hurt us, what causes us to initially reject them is less easy to determine. Rozin, who was recently interviewed by Alison Bruzek of NPR’s The Salt blog, believes that most of these behaviors are likely to be the result of social pressures.

"I don’t know the answer," he admitted in the interview. "Some part of it is social. Social forces affect what we like, and the advertising industry knows that — that’s why they have endorsements by famous people."

Exposure Matters

The amount we are exposed to certain foods can also play a vital role. Rozin discussed during the interview how young children in Mexico didn’t inherently love spicy chillies, but grew to appreciate them by around the age of 4 or 5 years old.

"The experience of eating it a lot somehow converts what was an aversion to a preference."

Another term Rozin coined to describe such phenomenon was "hedonistic reversal," the ability that our brain holds to tell our senses that we’re going to turn something we ought to avoid into a preference.

So if your child is avoiding eating their peas or carrots now, don't worry just yet! Things might not stay that way as they mature.

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