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Home Culture & Arts Social Media Freaks Out Over Viral "Charlie Charlie" Challenge

Social Media Freaks Out Over Viral "Charlie Charlie" Challenge

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viral-charlie-charlie-challenge-mainPhoto Credit: Twitter

Another week, another viral social media challenge... right? Urban legends step aside, because the Charlie Charlie Challenge is here.

And while there may be a perfectly legit scientific explanation for what is going on in these videos, it is still pretty spooky to watch. 

The Charlie Charlie Challenge (or Charlie Charlie: The Pencil Game) involves people placing one pencil across the middle of another above a piece of paper with “Yes” and “No” squares. The next step is to summon the spirit of a Mexican demon with the words “Charlie, Charlie, are you here?” (not sure how this is Mexican, but oh well?) to see what Señor Charlie thinks of your question.

See some of the responses below... 

Rumor has it the #CharlieCharlieChallenge has ancient traditional origins and there are actual rules of conduct for those participating in the ghostly game. For example, players must chant “Charlie, Charlie can we stop” and drop all the pencils when done so that the demon portal to his or her own home hasn’t been left wide open for all eternity - talk about creepy! 

Some people have reportedly had strange occurrences while playing the game, like hearing a child's laughter or seeing shadows. In some of the videos above, there were definitely some odd things going on but if that was Charlie or someone doing the trick for more retweets, we'll never know. 

It is more likely that a breath, a breeze, a vibration could move a mere pencil laying on top of another pencil. Nonetheless, One Direction/Justin Bieber fans are totally on board.


So why is this particular game so popular? Well, the Smithsonian Magazine  did an interesting study about Ouija boards (or items like them) and the amazement/scare tactics that come with.

“It can generate a very strong impression that the movement is being caused by some outside agency, but it’s not,” Professor Chris French explained to Smithsonian, noting there is also “the whole social context” of the game.

“It’s usually a group of people, and everyone has a slight influence... Once the idea has been implanted there, there’s almost a readiness to happen.”

And when you've got social media to play such a game, it makes for a quick viral trend. 

Let's just hope this is all harmless fun, but either way, score another win for the Internet being oh, so weird! 


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