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Home On the Trail Style Snapshots From The Campaign Trail: Female Candidates

Style Snapshots From The Campaign Trail: Female Candidates

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  • Style Snapshots From The Campaign Trail: Female Candidates

    Style Snapshots From The Campaign Trail: Female Candidates

    As we know, fashion can be pretty powerful and, like it or not, it holds some significance while out on the campaign trail. And for the only two females in the current 2016 Presidential Elections race, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and politician Carly Fiorina, personal style is a reflection of their preferences and personality. Here are some  snapshots of their campaign style signatures and how the candidates use their style to demand a presence. 

     

    Photo Credit: Splash; John Raoux/AP

  • Public Speaking Style

    Public Speaking Style

    Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton commands a room while wearing her signature colorful pantsuits while presidential hopeful Carly Fiorina uses clean lines on feminine dresses when speaking her message. 

     

    Photo Credit: Splash; Getty

  • Back In Black

    Back In Black

    Both candidates know how to combine their campaign fashions in stylish black. 

    Photo Credit: Splash; AP

  • About Face

    About Face

    Having perfectly applied makeup is crucial for any public figure. Clinton prefers a "no makeup" makeup look while Fiorina spots black-lined eyes with pink lips. 

     

    Photo Credit: Splash; AP

  • Signature Colors

    Signature Colors

    Wearing a signature color can make a politician  more memorable; Clinton prefers blue to Fiorina's reds. 

    Photo Credit: Splash; AP

  • Feminine Touch

    Feminine Touch

    Just because they work in a male-dominated field doesn't mean that these female politicians forgo something pretty. Both candidates prefer statement necklaces paired with small matching earrings.  

    For more on Clinton and Fiorina's style, read this fashion profile here.  

    Photo Credit: Splash; The Christian Science Monitor

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