Womens Forum - Live, Love, Inspire

  • 48em
  • 48fb
  • 48tw
Home Parenting Teens & Tweens Talk to Your Teens and Tweens About Sex

Talk to Your Teens and Tweens About Sex

Share It

talk-to-your-teens-and-tweens-honestly-about-sexSex education is partially your job, so here's how to do it!

During puberty and the teenage years, hormones are raging. Teens and tweens don’t necessarily know what they’re feeling, even if they’ve taken some sort of health class at school. Having a frank and honest talk about sex and sexual safety can really help your teen or tween understand what they are feeling.


Telling your teen about the realities of the birds and the bees can only help in the long run. Not only will they have realistic expectations, but you may also help them decide what they are comfortable with.

It's also important to create an open dialogue, where your teen or tween can ask you any questions they have about sex or sexuality. It may be uncomfortable, but momentary discomfort is heavily outweighed in the long run if it can save your teen from STIs or unwanted pregnancy.

Talking to Your Child About Sex

It's important to be direct, but also not to just lecture. Don’t use scare tactics. Studies show that they don’t work (and neither does abstinence-only education). Instead, try to let them know that you went through exactly what they’re going through when you were their age. Regardless of ethics or religious beliefs, your teen or tween deserves accurate information regarding sex.

Explain to your teen that saying “no” is always okay. They are in charge of their body sexually and never have to feel bad for saying “no” if they don’t want or approve of any sexual advance. A lot of dating begins during the teenage years, so talk to your teen about the difference between healthy and unhealthy relationships to make sure they stay safe and happy.

Try not to just talk to your teen or tween about their own anatomy, but also the anatomy of the other gender so they can be educated and respectful.

And, lastly, end the conversation on an open note. Let your teen know that whenever they have a question regarding sex or sexuality, you’re there and ready to provide them with answers.

Share It