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Home Living Her Vote The Biggest Social Media Moment From The Second Democratic Debate

The Biggest Social Media Moment From The Second Democratic Debate

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Photo Credit: Getty

On a night overcast by the tragedy of the Paris attacks, the second Democratic primary debate on November 13, 2015 was understandably a somber affair. 

Reportedly 8.5 million viewers tuned in - that's almost half the audience of the first Democratic debate. Those who did watch got an unsatisfactory performance from the usually energetic two front-runners, Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders. Some even noted underdog Martin O'Malley's debate performance proves he shouldn't be discounted as a contender. On social media, it was Bernie Sanders who came out ahead, gaining the most new Twitter followers.  

So how did Sanders slow Clinton's momentum, at least online? After the first debate, everyone was praising Clinton's performance, even Donald Trump! Well, national security dominated the debate, as well as differences in dealings with Wall Street. Unlike Hillary Clinton's poised performance in the first debate, the former Secretary of State seemed shaken up and even delivered some questionable lines that blew up on social media.

Here is what you need to know about the biggest social media moment of the debate.

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Photo Credit: Getty

The Clinton/Sanders Wall Street Debate was the top social media moment from the Iowa debate, according to Facebook. Sanders pounced on Clinton, saying "Why, over her political career, has Wall Street been the major campaign contributor to Hillary Clinton? Maybe they're dumb and they don't know what they're gonna get, but I don't think so.”

Clinton responded that she was proud to have thousands of supporters, continuing "I represented New York, and I represented New York on 9/11 when we were attacked. Where were we attacked? We were attacked in downtown Manhattan where Wall Street is. I did spend a whole lot of time and effort helping [Wall Street] rebuild. That was good for New York. It was good for the economy, and it was a way to rebuke the terrorists who had attacked our country.” Awkward, and apparently not the right thing to say in light of the Paris attacks.

Social media blew up.

RNC Chairman Reince Priebus tweeted, “@HillaryClinton, you reached a new low tonight by using 9/11 to defend your campaign donations." 

 Despite the bump in the road, Hillary Clinton still appears to be the Democratic Party's front-runner according to polls, but it'll be interesting to see if more Democrats wary of Wall Street start to "feel the Bern" in the upcoming debates.